Mossbrook Fire: 10 Days After Update

April 18th, 2014 (trackback)
Car Windshield After Fire

Lots of people are asking about various events related to the fire. This is a summary of the first 10 days of our adventure broken down as a series of short comments. A bit of a ramble in no particular order, I suspect, but here it is.

I chose the photo at left as a reminder of all the things we didn’t lose — no humans were hurt and all of the pets except one parakeet made it through unscathed — and that even such a destructive force as a fire can yield surprising beauty.


In the days that followed the event, the San Jose Fire Department sent crews around fairly often. Not just to ensure no hot spots remained, but also to use the event as a means of learning to fight such firees more effectively in the future. It was very interesting to be a part of the conversations as to how they’ll modify strategy in the future and what worked for this event. I’ll continue to collect photo streams and other information on the Photo Dump post (in fact, there will be a new stream on that post shortly after this is posted).

It was kind of funny how apologetic the fire fighters were about the destruction they caused in the house (which was quite minor compared to the destruction caused by the actual fire). I finally stopped the two that were walking me through after the fire, pointed out my kitchen window at the utter devastation of the house next door, and told them that saving my house was repayment 100 times over vs. any damage they may have caused.


Now that the laundry room — the inside portion of the house most severely impacted — has been cleared, it has become very clear just how close we were to losing most or all of the house. The roof is beyond charred. Take a log from your fireplace after a roaring fire? Yeah, that’s our laundry room ceiling.

While the wall burned through on the outside, it didn’t burn through the drywall. If we had the original thin wooden wall paneling in that room, it would be a very different picture. Drywall makes a good fire break.

Everything in the laundry room is a total loss save for any metal or ceramic pieces. The washer, dryer, and utility sink all partially melted.

The sliding door is gone, and the frame melted through. There is a pool of aluminum on the floor.

Water got into some of the slate floor tiles and caused them to explode as the water boiled. Not enough to need to replace the tiles, though.

We had California Closets based shelving/storage in the laundry room. It was OK, but sub-optimal. We are going to pay the difference between replacing that and fixing it properly and use this as an opportunity to fix it the way we want it. This also means we can fix the dryer vent and all the plumbing, both of which are… stupid.


Our foam roof likely also contributed to the preservation of the house. The straight tar/gravel original roof melts in a fire and drips, basically, raw fuel onto the fire below. While the covering on the foam is pretty toasty, and entirely gone in some spots, the closed cell foam underneath is fine. In fact, our roof should still be watertight. Apparently, that’ll be tested next week as there is rain in the forecast.

While the foam is intact, it won’t be for long. Because the cantilevered eaves are completely toasted, they have to be replaced. That means replacing at least 3x the length of the overhang on the other side to support the cantilever.

But they can’t simply be cut back to the first beam because that creates a hinge effect that weakens the structural integrity of the roof.

Thus, they roof decking will have to be cut back to the first, second, and possibly the peak on that slope of the house. Likely, it’ll be a mix of cut backs to try and preserve some of the wood.

Bottom line: The foam roof on that slope of our roof is coming entirely off.


Electrical Panel & Laundry Wall

The electrical infrastructure on the house is completely toasted. More likely than not, there will have to be channels cut through the foam on the roof all over the house to run new wiring pretty much everywhere needed.

Same goes for the water and gas, but that is much much simpler infrastructure than the spider web that is the electrical wiring throughout the house.

At least we’ll be able to fix our thermostat! And add an outlet here and there!


A temporary power pole has been installed in the back yard. But the City won’t grant a permit for hooking it up until some other bit of paperwork is completed. This is, apparently, a new requirement and our contractors are trying to figure out why.

We should have power on site in the next week. At the moment, we have extension cords running to two neighbor’s houses to power the various filters needed for the fish and to power the gigantic air filtration unit brought in by the cleaning company.

Yes, the neighbors will be able to bill us for power used and insurance will cover it. More importantly, by doing this we don’t have a generator in the neighborhood running 24/7.


The vultures and ambulance chasers have finally gone away. Within hours of the event and for days after, we had a stream of contractors and public insurance policy adjusters show up trying to convince us to hire them and sell us on the notion that our insurance company is The Enemy.

It was bad enough that I told two of them that stepping foot on my property would be considered trespassing as they were no longer welcome and they could take it up with the local police.

This isn’t to say that I wouldn’t be willing to use a policy adjuster, if it were really necessary. But, no, that isn’t happening unless there is some issue with the insurance company (so far, no signs at all that there will be). And I’m sure as hell not going to use one that showed up on my property after chasing down the news copters.



The insurance company (State Farm) has been, thus far, great to work with. Their general approach is to offer full solutions, never push any given provider, and allow us to hire whomever we want to do any particular bit of work.

So far, the recovery efforts involve the following providers:

    Jon R Crase Construction
    We were introduced to Crase on the evening of the fire. They are on the short list of companies that the fire department uses to secure a site once the flames are out. As well, Crase is used by State Farm to double-check whatever contractors one might hire. And, most importantly, they have Eichler experience. Representatives from Crase have been on site and have consistently gone well above and beyond any contractually expected services. And they have that Eichler experience.
    Servpro
    ServPro is doing a pack out cleaning & storage. That is, they are packing out everything in the house that was affected by smoke/fire, inventorying everything, cleaning anything that needs to be cleaned, and then storing it until the house is ready to be moved back into.

    For all intents and purposes, it is as if we are moving out and in to our own house.

    This includes everything in the garage. All those nuts, bolts, screws, nails, and hardware that Roger and I have been collecting over the years? Yeah. Packed. Inventoried. Cleaned. And eventually returned.

    Custom Craft Urethane
    Keith Nokes of Custom Craft, who did our roof after the last remodel, was on site with ladder up before we had even started to consider how to pursue reconstruction. He wanted to see what’s what and offer any information he could. He immediately volunteered that he would want to be present for any roof work regardless of who we hired (some insurance companies would insist on particular people to do certain tasks). Yeah… no… Keith / Custom Craft will be doing our roof. Period. End of story. There is no one else we would remotely consider.
    Horizon Energy Systems
    While the solar wasn’t damaged, it is going to have to come off the roof for the reconstruction as the roof under it will be mostly replaced. Horizon installed it in the first place and did great work (the linked post has some insight into the madness of an Eichler roof). Yes, there were some significant challenges to the original installation, but Horizon has since modified their installation procedures because of the mis-adventures on our roof. Out of pocket, we’ll be adding additional rails for mounting more panels (but will hold on adding panels until we have electricity again).

What’s next?

Unlike a remodel, half of the demolition was unplanned and performed by a the monster that is an uncontrolled fire.

Thus, none of the planning that would normally have taken place prior to applying the first SawzAll has occurred.

The immediate next steps — now that the clean up is largely done to the point that doesn’t require demolition — is to secure the various permits with the City of San Jose. To that end, the City sent out an inspector to assess damage, write a report and put it on file. With that in place, pulling the needed permits should be relatively straightforward. Should be.

We also need full design documents drawn up for the floor plan of the house. On these will go the schematics for any work to be done. Because the spiderweb that is the electrical is destroyed at the panel, it is likely that the work will reach all corners of the house.

Given that the roof will be torn up, the walls redone, the laundry room rebuilt, etc… we’ll likely also use this as an opportunity to fix a few things here and there.



Mossbrook Fire: How can you help?

April 13th, 2014 (trackback)

They are questions that hav come up over and over; “How can I help?”, “What do you need?”, “What can we do?”.

The generosity and support of our neighbors, our friends, and our community have been truly amazing. We are surrounded by kind, generous, and awesome people through which we would easily have many places we could stay, temporary homes for our dogs, and all the support in the world.

But, really, we — the Bumgarner family, specifically — are fine. We, through an odd coincidence, have a house to live in for the near term and our insurance company’s response has been incredible (enough so, that a whole post will be devoted to the insurance process).

The two neighbors that lost their houses have places to stay, too. While there losses are total, their immediate needs are covered (seriously — the Bumgarner family got off easy in this one!).

And, really, this is about the same story is it will be with any disaster where the families involved are both fully insured and live in a supportive community.

So, how can you help?

At the scene as it happens?

Get the person away from watching the destruction of all their worldly possessions. Take them into a home far enough away from the scene so as to not be able to directly watch, but close enough to still be available and “behind the lines”, so to speak.

A couple of neighbors did that for my wife, son, and dogs. It was a tremendous help. It provides a base of sanity and calm in between bouts of dealing with the chaos.

Just Be Available (But Don’t Interrogate)

Every person will process what has happened differently and at a different pace. Some won’t need much support at all, others may need lots. Some might need some very odd thing to make them whole again.

Providing the most basic of support through simply listening will be of great help.

Avoid interrogation. No, in the 48 hours after the event, we don’t know how long it’ll take to rebuild our house, we don’t know what the neighbors’ plans are and, no, it really isn’t helpful to suggest what the neighbors might do one way or another. We — all of us, neighbors whose houses were unaffected, too — are simply trying to get to tomorrow with one less set of variables hanging over our heads.

Host or Provide a Home Cooked Meal

On the night after the fire, a friend of ours showed up with a steak, potato and asparagus dinner. She set the table, served the meal and cleaned up. It was, truly, a wonderfully relaxing and therapeutic event.

Last night, another friend of ours brought over a gigantic pot of jambalaya and we had dinner with the family that lost their home. Their comment? “This is the first home cooked meal we’ve had and it is wonderful.”

So, really, something as simple as inviting the impacted families for a simple meal or taking a meal to them will provide more comfort than you can imagine.

Donate to the Red Cross

The Red Cross was on scene the evening of the fire and had a triage center set up at the nearest school. They found lodging for the one family that needed it and triple-checked that the rest of us really did have a viable living plan. Within 24 hours, the Red Cross had agents in the area to see if anyone needed any kind of support, including counseling to deal with the trauma of the event. This included support for all of those living in the neighborhood.

Make Sure This Doesn’t Happen To You!

More likely than not, this was initially an electrical fire. The houses in our neighborhood were all built in the early 1960s and many have the original breaker box with the original wiring. In particular, all of the houses were built with Zinsco electrical panels. They aren’t safe.

So, yes, you should, right now, go out, have a look at your electrical panel, and replace it if it is more than a few decades old or otherwise unsafe.

Same goes for your gas infrastructure. Go have a sniff around your meter. Or ask that the gas company bring a sniffer and simply check. In the wake of the fire, PG&E went door to door with a sniffer and checked for leaks. Sure enough, at least one neighbor had a leaky connection near the meter.


Mossbrook Fire: Photo & News Dump

April 12th, 2014 (trackback)
IMG 2151

Being in the middle of a multi-home fire event with extensive destruction, there is a large pool of people that want to know what happened, how it happened, and progress during cleanup. Beyond the obvious family members, this also includes the various insurance company agents, fire investigators, and the fire department (who has regularly sent out crews to the site to both ensure no flare ups, but also to talk through the fight with those not there to ensure their techniques are refined in the future).

This post is for all of them. And it is to highlight the absolutely fantastic neighborhood that we live in.

Our neighbor, Al Boyden, was one of the first on the scene with a camera (that is his picture to the left). His iCloud photo stream includes photos from very near the beginning of the fire through to the photo to the left, when both the neighbor’s house was fully in flames and the fire trucks were just rolling up. I’ll have to ask Al to update the photos with the original timestamps. It is astonishing how fast an Eichler goes from “singed in the corner” to “full blown, total destruction, flames”.

My photo stream contains a series of photos taken after the fact that include documentation of both the destruction wrought and the cleanup process. Eventually, it’ll also include all the photos of the reconstruction process (which will be quite involved and, in some respects, even more involved than our remodel because part of the roof is going to be replaced).

Craig Allyn Rose appears to be an official photographer for the SJFD and has an incredible gallery of images from the event. The photos are primarily taken nearer to the two neighbors whose houses were destroyed. I’ve reached out to Craig to see if there is any additional information he would like added to this post. (Thank you, Craig, for your efforts and for sharing.)

Another professional photography on the scene was Chris Smead of Chris Smead Photography, who also works with the Fire Department.



Mossbrook Fire: The Media Machine Kinda Sucks

April 11th, 2014 (trackback)
Mossbrook Fire Panorama

90 more seconds.

A gentle wind blowing from the opposite direction.

That is all that made the difference between our house being the and one house was severely damaged vs. one of the houses that were destroyed in all the news reports.

Well, it would be if any of the news reports were correct. Even individual reports started out claiming that 3 houses were destroyed with a paragraph or two later claiming that a bulldozer arrived to tear down the two houses that were destroyed with one house receiving cosmetic damage (Uh… that my house’s entire electrical subsystem is melted and the laundry room is a black pit of doom doesn’t seem cosmetic).

Here are some facts. This is not a complete set, but merely a set of facts that are all quite directly addressed at the wild inaccuracies in the press:

  1. 1 house was destroyed completely, 1 house was gutted save for the garage, and 1 house — our house — was heavily damaged on the side facing the house that was destroyed.
  2. Of the two destroyed homes, only one is down and that is because it was collapsing once the fire was under control. The bulldozer was used to pull it down further so that hot spots could be uncovered so they could be doused with foam (in fact, one such hot spot reared up and produced 6′ flames at midnight, nearly 7 hours after the blaze was brought under control).
  3. Of the two destroyed homes, the families have lost everything.
  4. Burst Propane Tankes
  5. There were no gunshots. There were explosions. At least three of them in fact. And the propane tanks that were the source of [most of?] those explosions are currently in my backyard (but the firefighters moved them into my yard to get ‘em out of the way).
  6. The fire was not caused by a gas leak, nor was there a gas leak during the blaze. The fire was fueled by gas because the fire destroyed both gas pipes in the house and then the meter at the front of the house. So, yeah, that is sort of a gas leak. But not really.
  7. It took a while to turn off the gas because you can’t just turn off a whole neighborhood without the gas in the pipes feeding the flames for quite a while. Turning off the gas to a single home in an older neighborhood involves either turning off the gas at the meter (which was in flames) or digging up the connection to the gas mains and disconnecting the pipe there.
  8. I found Tyson, the dog, after the fire when we were first allowed to go into our house. Or he found me. When I walked into the backyard, he was standing in the backyard of his (now destroyed) home. I’m not entirely sure where he bunked down during the fire (most likely in the shadow of a stump), but there he was without even a bit of singing. He greeted me with a wag and bolted out the front door to find Paul, the kid who rescued him in the first place and for whom he shows a loyalty that only a dog can exhibit. Fantastic dog, by the way.
  9. There was no large scale evacuation. The immediate neighbor next to the fire was evacuated from her home. Beyond that, neighbors voluntarily left and stayed behind the lines of defense established by the fire department. Most of us hung out in a neighbor’s yard, generally being very supportive (our neighborhood is awesome), and sharing a bit of wine.

Beyond the simple fact that having your house damaged or destroyed by fire really really sucks, it is quite odd to be one of the unwilling subjects of a major news story. We heard tale from neighbors that their families in other states were calling them because they saw a blurb on the news.

The odd part is how every single article out there got one or many of the bullet points above wrong. I chose that particular set of facts because I read a story that incorrectly made a claim in conflict with said facts. Things move fast and I understand how such errors might happen, but to see a single article claim both that all three houses were destroyed and one house was destroyed and two houses had minor damage is indicative of how little importance is given to accuracy.


Great Blue Heron

December 2nd, 2013 (trackback)
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

This morning, Roger pointed out that a Great Blue Heron had perched in a tree at the edge of my parent’s pond (Columbia, MO). Cool. Grab the camera. Maybe I can get a shot or two.

Out of the 40+ pictures I took, this was the only real keeper. Frankly, that seems about right for a rather large, rather skittish bird hanging about in bad morning light (overcast to the point of dim).

Happy enough, I figured that was that.

Later in the morning, with the sun out, Roger mentioned that the Heron was back and fishing in the shallow end of the pond. I grabbed the camera and headed outside, but couldn’t find it.

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

Until this popped up from behind the retaining wall between wall and pond.

The Heron was definitely back and put on quite a show!

I was able to take a bunch of decent pictures which you can see below the fold.

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Philips Hue: Almost the Perfect Lighting Solution

October 12th, 2013 (trackback)

Update (3/28/14): Today, Philips announced the “Tap” switch for the Hue..

While it is very very cool technology (battery-less, wireless, scene direction for the Hue), it still doesn’t solve the very basic problem of integrate the Hue with the dead, simple, stupid, 100 year old this switch controls that light model of lighting control in use in just about every household that exists.

While you could hardwire the existing light switch to be always on and then use the Tap to control various lights, it would be aesthetically unpleasing and not nearly as convenient.

Until there exists a Tap-like device that is the same form factor and provides the same dead, simple, stupid “flip this to turn on/off that” mode of operation, the Hue — and every other pending solution like it — will not be a true home lighting solution.

Worse, it won’t achieve the promise. Right now, I have two if-this-then-that recipes that control the lights in our bedroom to wake us up and tell us about the pending day. One light will glow yellow or blue to indicate sun or rain. The other light glows from blue to orange to yellow to red (which, btw, was a pain in the butt to set up in IFTTT) depending on the high temperature for the day.

And we never see these programs run. Why? Because the last thing we do before going to bed is hit the light switch on the wall, cutting power to the Hues entirely. As does pretty much everyone.


Nearly a year ago, I upgraded all of the standard incandescent lights in the house to Philips Hue. The Hue is an LED lamp that gives off a decent amount of light — 60 watt incandescent range.

The Hue can also be remotely controlled via ZigBee. The Hue starter pack comes with a hub and 3 lamps. The hub has an ethernet port (no Wifi) and communicates with the Hue lamps throughout the house wirelessly.

It works really well. Better yet, there is a full API for controlling the Hue lamps and, as a result, there are a couple of dozen apps for controlling the Hue for both iOS devices and OS X. As well, the fabulous if-this-then-that site can control the Hue lamps based on various inputs. Want to have the Hue in the living to glow red on a warm day and blue on a cold day? No problem. What the Hue in your office to glow red when $AAPL is down and green when it is up? Easy peasy.

Yet, unfortunately, I can’t really recommend the Hue as anything beyond a novelty. Not because of any flaw in the Hue itself as it is a fantastic product, but because of what is lacking.

The critical missing piece is Hue compatible light switch. For example, when I walk into the bedroom at night, I hit one or both of the wall switches at the door, and I expect there to be light. Similarly, when I flip the switch off, the lights should go off. Now, unfortunately, this — as expected — kills all power to the Hue. No amount of remote control is going to light a lamp that isn’t plugged in!

One possible solution is to use something like the WeMo switch. It can be integrated with if-this-then-that to turn on/off a Hue or set of Hues when the switch is toggled. Beyond being expensive ($50/switch), there is a 7 to 10 second lag between the switch being activated and the light state changing. That assumes, of course, that the myriad of moving virtual parts between the light switch and the light are all up and running.

Way too Rube Goldberg to be acceptable.

Another possibility would be to configure a web server on a computer to receive the WeMo input, then fire a command off against the Hue hub. This would, at least, confine the Complex Machine to our house, but I’m really not interested in adding yet another server that needs administration to my life.


Kickstarter Opportunity!

To complete the Hue as a home lighting solution, there needs to be a light switch optimized to the Hue hub itself. Ideally, it would communicate over Zigbee to talk directly to the hub, reducing the switch-light hop count to 1. The switch would leave the Hue always powered. While it could be automatically configurable, that really isn’t necessary. The Hue management app could easily provide a list of switches and lights. Toggle the switch and it highlights. Select which lights should be controlled by the switch and you’re all set.

Alternatively, there is definitely a Kickstarter opportunity here and no one has come close (there have been a couple of “TCP/IP switches” on KS, but they all go for the kitchen sink of features). The key is dead simple; the switch could be as simple as on/off. Even basic dimming isn’t really necessary. Just an on/off toggle that doesn’t power off the device it is connected to, but sends a command to the Hue Hub over Wifi (because Philips has not opened ZigBee interface). Only need a 2-way switch because 3-way could be done entirely in software and could be implemented as n-way. The switch could be Hue compatible primarily, but that pretty much implies that it is a TCP/IP switch. Configuration is an obvious challenge; a bit of a chicken and egg situation there. Unless something like WPS (Wireless Protected Setup) could be used to automatically configure the switch, then I suppose it would have to have a USB port or something.

In any case, keep it simple. Go for maximal cost reduction while still producing an attractive product. I’d back it in a heartbeat, as I expect would many Hue owners.


Bluetooth Keyboard Caps

June 22nd, 2013 (trackback)
Redesigned Keyboard Cap

v1.0, pictured below, proved lacking.

v2.0, in red, appears at the left.

The size difference between the end cap and the bit that rests against the end of the keyboard was widened considerably. The old piece would slip over the keyboard and the closed end would activate the power button. The open end combined with the wider overhang, seems, so far, to be a better, more durable, design.

Yes, my printer’s belts need to be tightened.

Thingiverse Updated.


Apple BT Keyboard End Caps

Recently, I’ve been carrying an Apple Bluetooth Keyboard with my iPad mini so I can compose relatively long emails. Nothing beats a keyboard for text entry!

While I love the keyboard, it does have an annoying habit of turning on when floating about my murse.

A few minutes in Autodesk Inventor Fusion and I whipped up some printable caps that slide over the ends of the keyboard. The cap protects the power button from accidental activation (there are two styles of caps, one more defensive than the other) and by placing a cap at both ends, they can be left in place while using the keyboard and it remains level.

The STL files and some more photos can be found on thingiverse.com.

Aside: I clearly need to reprint that piece. I had some schmutz on the print bed, leading to the end not being smooth. That and it looks like my belts need tightening. I’ll switch colors to clear and re-print someday soon.

Aside^2: Something snapped in my brain since the last time I messed with Inventor Fusion. In particular, I went from nerver using to completely embracing the construction feature. Basically, construction allows you to place axis or planes relative to features on the model. Thus, if you want to bisect the model to, say, make the inside wall of a tube a bit fatter for a few millimeters near the end, you simply place a plane parallel to the end face, offset a few millimeters into the tube and then bisect the model with the plane.



OS X Client Software for Owon SDS7102 Digital Storage Oscilloscope

April 15th, 2013 (trackback)

Ever since using my first Oscilloscope in the ’80s, I’ve wanted one. Though I’m a software person by trade, my hobbies have long included electronics in many forms. Heck, I’ll take a well tuned, clean, pinball game over a video game any day (and if it isn’t well tuned and clean, I’ll do that, too). An oscilloscope has long been the ultra-expensive super tool that my hobbyist pursuits just couldn’t justify the expense.

Not any more.

Recently, I picked up a cheap treadmill to turn into a “walking desk”. It works fine, save for the annoyance that it turns off ever 30 minutes and the control box is this big, ugly, clunky thing that clearly is a whole lot dumber than the LED display indicates. In adding some extra length to the control box’s cable, I noted there were only three wires; power, ground, and a signal wire.

Clearly, given price point and lack of real communication between control box and treadmill, the “protocol” between the two is likely nothing more than a PWM signal.

Which, given that the treadmill (Confidence Treadmill) is for my health, health is vital, and the best way to explore that signal deeper, I investigated picking up an oscilloscope for the first time in 15 years.

Boy howdy. What a difference those 15 years made! I was used to seeing depressing 4 digit numbers on scopes that were somewhat slow, very bulky and had little to no means of exporting data save for snapping a picture. Now? Less than $500 gets you a multi-input ‘scope capable of handling up to 100MHz signals with lots of analysis features and the ability to dump it all to USB or, in some cases, the network.

A bit of research revealed that the Rigol DS1102E is the most popular of the sort of entry level digital scopes.

However, the Owon scope pictured at left was only $50 more, has a much larger screen, and a LAN port. Rigol’s ds2072 is similar, but nearly $400 more and is backordered pretty much everywhere. While the Owon has had some negative reviews, the latest version seems to have addressed almost all of the criticisms. That, combined with the realization that I’m not exactly going to be pushing it (and a bit of a desire for immediate gratification) and I went with the Owon.

Couldn’t be happier. The Owon SDS7102 seems to work just fine; more than enough for my needs. The user interface is pretty mediocre, but passable.

I’ll let people far more competent than me properly review the scope.


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Ratchet & Clank Infinite Bolt Hack (and Much Much More)

December 29th, 2012 (trackback)

The whole Ratchet & Clank series of games is just fantastic (save for the last one or two that kinda lost the plot). This year, the first 3 games were remastered for the PS3; 1080p and a bunch of new content. If you like 3D platformers and haven’t played R&C, I highly encourage you to do so.

R&C features a whole slew of upgradeable weapons. You collect bolts — the in-game currency — and use those to buy new weapons (and ammo). There is one incredibly powerful black market weapon available called the R.Y.N.O. (the “Rip Ya A New One” gun). Priced at 150,000 bolts, it would take many, many hours of repetitive game play to harvest enough bolts (until you beat the final boss once and start over in challenge mode where bolt collection is 2x to 3x faster).

Photo
Photo 1

There aren’t any cheat codes that’ll get bolts any faster, but there are bugs that can be exploited. Specifically, you can exploit a flaw in the geometry engine to go through a wall, fly through a roof and then fly to a race track where the game engine rules are tuned to you being on a hoverboard. In particular, you can use “the taunter” to break boxes of bolts in a way that the boxes keep breaking for as long as you hold down the “taunt” button.

It takes about 3 or 4 hours of taunting boxes to generate the 150,000 bolts to grab the R.Y.N.O.

Now, of course, this hack — “cheat” implies a Konami-Kode, this is much more of an exploit than a purposeful feature — is well documented online. This is a pretty typical example video.

It, however, is the hard way. A much easier way to do this is to go to the room containing the two health globes (screenshot(s) forthcoming) that said video shows you flying to. Once in the room, stand in the corner behind the globes and knock yourself through the wall using the decoys. Once through the wall, walk to the left along the narrow ledge until you are between the building and a really tall wall that goes over the race track. Wall jump up to the top of the building and fly to the race track as the video shows.

Much, much easier than the video for several reasons. First, going through a right-angle corner is a lot easier than that nuttiness in the raceway plaza. Secondly, no need to fly nearly blind from way up high through the roof of the building.

Of course, the hacker in me immediately asked “Why does this happen and can we exploit this further?”

Turns out that the answer is a resounding yes. It is really easy to find flaws in the game geometry that can be exploited. Look for sharp corners and aim your decoy gun (or any gun with a target) into them. If the gun’s target jumps between planes rapidly — better yet, if there are places where it will steadily oscillate between two planes — you can almost assuredly use the Decoy trick to knock yourself through that spot into whatever is beyond.

The glitches that result can be pretty mind bending. I have yet to see the game crash, but “divide-by-zero” would be an apt description of some of the results.

I’ve now used this in a few places in the game to complete a mission without doing any of the intervening bits or to get into a secret room without bothering to find the oft-well-hidden entrance.

Roger & I now have quite a few worlds to explore!




Xcode: Sometimes a return is not a return (emacs brain damage)

December 23rd, 2012 (trackback)
ExpectedExpression
Indention and Insertion Prefs

Every now and then, I’ll be coding along merrily in Xcode and I’ll get an error much like the one at left. Or “expected identifier or ‘(‘” is another variant.

Huh? That code is fine. Maybe it is an invisible character? Nope. Nothing shown.

Took a bit, but I figured out the cause; 25 years of using emacs as my command line editor of choice, along with the folks at NeXT that implemented the AppKit’s text editor.

In emacs, you quite commonly navigate about by holding down the ctrl- key and banging on various keys to go to the beginning/end of lines, etc. Many of these control sequences are honored by Cocoa’s text editing system and quite a few more are supported in Xcode’s editor.

Seemingly unrelated, ctrl-return is mapped to Insert Line Break.

Thus, if you are an emacs head and you commonly hit ctrl-e<return> to start a new line of code and you happen to hold down the return key just a tad too long, it causes the error shown (or a variant depending on where the insert happens).

The easiest way to tell if this is the case is to go to the line of code after the line reporting the error and hit ctrl-a. If the cursor ends up at the beginning of the previous line, that line is ended by a line break and not a true newline. (ctrl-n – backspace – return to quickly fix).

While it is easy enough to fix once you know the ctrl-a trick, a better fix is one that makes it such that it’ll never happen again.

To do that, go to Xcode’s Key Bindings Preferences, click on “Text”, and scroll down to Insertions and Indetions. On Insert Line Break, delete the ctrl-return (hat + u-turn arrow) key sequence. For convenience add the same to Insert Newline.

Problem solved.