Archive for January, 2015

PhotoSweeper: Photo De-Duplicator for Aperture / iPhoto / Lightroom / etc.

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

Since I started taking photos 15 years ago, I’ve amassed a pile of images. 25,000 or so photos sourced from various cameras, phones and a handful that were scanned and imported. They have been managed manually, in various flavors of iPhoto, the occasional random application, and — for the past few years — in Aperture. Copies of the photos have lived on various computers and, even, have been recovered from backups after a rare hard drive death (multi-point backup strategy FTW!).

End result?

25,000 images of which somewhere between 5% and 20% are duplicates. Many of them are straight up duplicates; copies of the same image with different filenames resulting from merging various libraries or importing source media to multiple destinations that were later merged. Some are more insidious. Somewhere, something decided to down-res a slew of images and re-import them. Somewhere else, something decided to re-encode all my JPEG images (before RAW) at the same resolution, but with much higher compression.

Slogging through all those images would take hours. Days, really, as it’d have to be done in my spare time. And, given that it is a task I’ve been avoiding — digging the whole deeper — for a decade+, clearly not going to happen soon.

Clearly, there has to be a better way. And there is!

A quick search yielded PhotoSweeper.

On first pass, it quickly eliminated all straight up duplicates where the actual contents were identical. This took less than ten minutes to do on those 25,000 images and it eliminated nearly 4,000 dupes (and triplets and the occasional quad).

The second pass is where this software really shines. I configured it to do a content comparison and flag any sets of images that were pretty close, but not necessarily exactly, similar. In this case, I used the “approximate, align and blur” method. That is, PhotoSweeper re-renders each image as a 144×144 grid of pixels, then blurs it slightly, and aligns the edges. The resulting icon-ized images are compared and any that are similar enough are flagged as potential dupes. It is then a matter of review-and-compare. The arrow keys are used to navigate and the return key to toggle whether or not the image will be trashed.

One click and all the identified dupes are dumped in the trash.

What would have taken days of tedium was reduced to less than an hour. Personally? I would have paid $50 — nay, $100 — for this and have considered it a bargain. It saved me that much time (frankly, it finished a task in short order I’ve been putting off for a decade) and now my remaining organization task is largely one of actually looking at, tagging, and categorizing the photos.

And sharing them with my family. Because that’s what it is all about (for me).


Alaska

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015
Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)

Over the summer, we escaped for a while to Alaska via a trip put together by International Expeditions. This was our second trip with the company — our first being a week on the Amazon River (fun story, photo set on flickr) — and it certainly won’t be our last as International Expeditions does a fantastic job.

For the Alaska trip, we opted for the 11 day grand tour.

Beyond a fantastic tour of glaciers, a backcountry lake lodge, and Denali National Park, highlights included fantastic lodging in the most remote of places, incredible homemade meals, mind blowing scenery, and a wonderfully friendly group of random travel companions that quickly become a temporary family (with whom we wouldn’t mind crossing paths again!).

It was, no surprise, a great place to take photos and I’ve pushed an album to Flickr.

Alaska is both surprisingly diverse and, yet, equally as surprisingly limited in natural diversity.

On our tour, we ranged from a coastal rainforest to arctic tundra and even spent some time in the air flying around Mt. Denali.

And that covered a very tiny part of the state. It is also hard to fathom just how big Alaska truly is. Watching this glacier calve, we were nearly 1 mile away from it and yet it still seems to tower above us and there were still miles of glacier behind and above it! And beyond the top of that glacier? An ice field that is larger than most states in the lower 48.

Alaska is very different than anywhere else we’ve visited. Whereas the Amazon was full of a seeming infinite number of species of plant an animal, there are actually very few species in Alaska; only 150 or so native plants have been cataloged (with many variants within those particular individuals).

While in the rainforests of the equator, things rot with incredible speed, trees may lie on the ground in the Alaska rainforest for years because their simply isn’t the warmth or sunlit energy to support the decomposing agents. Thus, the Alaskan rainforest floor is a thick layer of, well, mulch on top of rock. Springy, almost magical to walk on. But no real dirt.

And some of the seemingly most innocuous and beautiful plants are quite deadly.

Even the mosquitos are different. In Alaska, the mosquitos are the top pollinator. All those incredibly yummy tundra blueberries, cranberries, and crowberries? Pollinated by mosquitos. Still annoying critters. But mosquito defense did lead to some interesting fashion statements.

A fantastic place to visit!

Icy Creek Pt 3: Ice Fractals

Thursday, January 1st, 2015
Ice Patterns on Creek

Ice Patterns on Creek

Suspended Ice

While walking on the creek, Roger and I found lots of different patterns of ice on the creek. There simply wasn’t any smooth ice anywhere.

Fractals, fractals, everywhere.

Some were on the surface of the water. Some floated above. Some were clear, others were not. All were beautiful.

Ice Patterns on Creek


Icy Creek Pt. 2: A Physics Lesson (Newton’s Rings)

Thursday, January 1st, 2015
Ice Rainbow
Ice Rainbow

As Roger and I were walking along the frozen creek we were (duh!) throwing rocks to break ice, stomping on the ice, and generally checking out all the neat patterns that naturally occur (including the ice lens and another post that will highlight the amazing fractals that occur naturally).

When looking closely at some of the cracks, I noticed rainbows. Rainbows everywhere! They were typically formed right along the cracks and I had assumed they were the result of stress in the ice.

Sort of.

They are actually, as @maclemon kindly shared on Twitter, examples of Newton’s Rings.

I’m not smart enough to grok the Wikipedia entry entirely, but armed with that, I was able to search for other discussions.

Here is someone who ran across them in their backyard and did a bit of research.

And here is a whole discussion of the phenomena with lots of studio photos.

The photos at the left are two photos of the same spot. The top photo is focused on the surface and the bottom is focused on the plane of the rainbow.

I may add some more photos if I happen to see some neat patterns. Because, clearly, more ice shall be broken.


Icy Creek Pt 1; Natural Lenses

Thursday, January 1st, 2015
Frozen Ice Lens on Leaf

Roger and I went for a long walk near my parent’s house in Columbia, MO. Being the end of the year, it is freezing cold and still. Ideal weather to produce ice on the ponds and creeks of the area.

While walking on the creek, we noticed that a couple of leaves had formed little balls of ice on the end of them. The ice was perfectly clear and the shape was quite regular.

Almost lens like, really.

Roger Through an Ice Lens
Through an Ice Lens

Sure enough. It did act as a lens!

These were shot with a 100mm macro lens on a Canon 7d Mk II (my christmas present).